Tag Archives: Alfred Lord Tennyson

Highland Hobo Epilogue

Welcome home card

Welcome home card

Mark Chadwick, the Course Director for my Winter Mountain Leader (WML) assessment, passed my logbook across the table. There was a new red sticker in the WML section.

 

I had passed.

 

Primarily I was relieved, but then wondered what to do next. Better go and pack up and leave, was my conclusion. Clearly the culmination of six weeks was a huge anticlimax, but I was profoundly glad that the process had come to a happy end.

 

During the assessment, I was reminded of the Kraken, a mythical sea monster that is said to have ambushed ships and consumed their crews. Another candidate, Lucy Wallace of Wild on Arran, who passed the week before, had also described the process like a sudden, but expected, attack by demons:

 

There is a demon waiting out there in the storm for every prospective winter ML candidate.  You know it is coming, but you have to wait to learn how and when it will attack.

 

Although the weather was wild on the first day when it became hard to see fellow candidates in the blizzard carrying out their ice axe arrest skills 10 metres down on a slope, I felt we were given a reprieve on the expedition. Navigation plays a big part in the assessment, and although we had low visibility, walking in cloud predominantly, there were no winds to deal with at the critical points.

 

Tennyson wrote a sonnet about the Kraken, but interestingly in the poem the beast remains hidden in the depths, silent, still and waiting. Only one day will it awake and roar to the surface. We had escaped the Kraken – the weather beasts had granted us safe passage, but they are still out there waiting for the unwary…

 

So there ends the mini-chronicle of the highland hobo. Hopefully most of my walking will now be in and out from climbing routes and leading clients and friends in winter conditions!

Categories: Blog, NGBs, Personal, Simon, Winter
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Highland Hobo #6

DSC06156

My favourite photo from the last month. Ben Alder, the ‘hill of rock and water’. A fitting title for a mountain which exhibits so flawlessly all the elemental aspects of the outdoors.

This is my final update before my Winter Mountain Leader (WML) assessment starts on Monday. It’s strange to think that I stepped onto the hillside of Lochnagar on New’s Year’s Day, a month ago yesterday.

 

I want to revisit briefly a legacy post to bring this little chronicle neatly to a close. I quoted from Ulysses, by Alfred, Lord Tennyson in Scotland, Skyfall & Ulysses and would like to mention The Charge of the Light Brigade in conclusion.

 

Cannon to right of them,
Cannon to left of them,
Cannon in front of them
Volleyed and thundered;
Stormed at with shot and shell,
Boldly they rode and well,
Into the jaws of Death,
Into the mouth of hell
Rode the six hundred.

 

I’ve invested a lot of time, effort and money into working towards the WML award. There have been sacrifices – family, comforts and conveniences – and it’s taken a lot of determination, and it all boils down to this coming week. Perhaps the process has become all-engrossing; I do feel that it’s now do or die.

 

The reference to The Charge of the Light Brigade is not meant to create an overly-heroic or macho image. Life will go on after the assessment regardless of the result. However, I have thought a lot about family, fathers and children while I’ve been away – unsurprising, I suppose, with a small family at home and in the face of very harsh and unrelenting conditions.

 

Little boys and girls idolise their fathers, and love to maintain their daddy as a hero who does great things and then comes home for hugs. All fathers are human and prone to fault, but all too often the role model of a father is lacking. Children don’t demand perfection, they are willing to forgive, but do look for a true heart. I quote The Charge of the Light Brigade because I want to be an inspiring role model to my girls and to encourage other fathers to be all they can be to their children.

 

It’s not about war heroism, putting on a façade or being false. Let’s not be melodramatic, no one’s going to die, but it’s about getting a job done. It’s about being all you can be and giving it your all. The poem talks about carrying on in the face of errors:

 

Not though the soldier knew
Someone had blundered.
Theirs not to make reply,
Theirs not to reason why,
Theirs but to do and die.

 

This week the weather may have some tricks up it’s sleeve . It’s a bit of an unknown, wondering how you’ll cope in gales and storms, whilst juggling all the other demands of a winter leader – navigation, avalanche and group safety, route choice. At the end of the end of the day, though, I hope I can put aside replies and reasoning whys and simply put to good affect the skills, knowledge and enthusiasm that I’ve built up over the last while.

 

I’m looking forward to a big hug with my wife and little girls next Sunday too.

 

 

Simon is the Morocco Director and an instructor with The Mountain People. He is currently preparing for his Winter Mountain Leader assessment, as chronicled by the ‘Highland Hobo’ series.


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